Posts Tagged ‘ sustainability ’

Lab Meat Burgers

As eating real animal meat becomes more and more unsustainable, scientists are turning their labs into food laboratories. CNN did a report on a lab-grown meat. Note that this meat was grown from real cow cells. One burger cost about $300,000. The lab meat has no fat — this affects its taste. And it only looks like meat due to added food coloring — lab meat is white! Yam!

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/world/2013/08/05/rivers-serving-up-stem-cell-burger.cnn.html

Tradition Versus Progress

Cindy Sui Taimanise handmade noodlesCindy Sui of BBC News wrote an article examining the economics of producing traditional food: “Calling time on Taiwan’s handmade noodles.”

Hand-pulled string noodles, called mian xian in Mandarin, have been made for around 2,000 years. … Today only about 50 noodle makers are thought to remain in Taiwan.”

The economics of producing the noodles by hand changed — a family making the noodles for 14 hours each day can make only $100. And the hand-made noodles are sold for $2 to $3 per bag. It’s too much effort for too little reward — not enough to feed a family and to provide for all the other basic needs. And so another food tradition has to die. There will still be people making noodles by hand, but it will be something very special (and very expensive) and so an average person might never taste “the real thing!”

Note by Note Gastronomy

molecular gastronomy
Chef Heston Blumenthal talks about the components of food — oils, amino acids, sugars, and other basic compounds — and how they can be used to create molecular gastronomy. This is food minus the fruits, vegetables, and meat… Enjoy!

Is this what we’ll eat in the future?

The Fall of Great Civilizations and Bad Soil

Homeland Security News Wire published as story on correlation between the fall of civilizations and poor spoil management: Planet’s arable land rapidly degrading.

Great civilizations have fallen because they failed to prevent the degradation of the soils on which they were founded. The modern world could suffer the same fate. A new study describes how the productivity of many lands has been dramatically reduced as a result of soil erosion, accumulation of salinity, and nutrient depletion.

Soil degradation map

Follow the Frog

Early on in our project, we considered making a “follow the chicken” stamp of approval aka Eco-Footprint Tracker — it you buy food with a chicken stamp on it, it was produced well, in a sustainable manner that didn’t hurt the environment.

Today, we saw “Follow the Frog” ad that summed up our idea. So follow the FROG!

Cost of Chicken Presentation at the California Science Teachers Conference

California Science Teachers Association LogoI’ve presented our project at the California Science Teachers Conference on October 19, 2012, in San Jose California. The teachers gathered for an evening discussion on the use of social media in science education. I talked about our CrowdMap, Ushahidi, and how our data can be used in a classroom. Below are some photos of the event. We also watched a few Green Ninja videos — a San Jose State University project teaching kids about conservation.

My presentation is linked below.

Nick Werby at the California Science Teachers Conference

Nick Werby at the California Science Teachers Conference

Nick Werby at the California Science Teachers Conference

2012-10-18 Cost of Chicken Slide Show

2012 10 18 Cost Of Chicken Slide Show Compressed from OlgaWerby

The True Cost of Food by the Sierra Club

We just came across this project by the Sierra Club: The True Cost of Food! Sounds familiar? It did to us! Here’s what they have to say:

The Sierra Club Sustainable Consumption Committee Mission: To encourage people to think about the environmental impacts of their consumption choices by providing specific information.

SOME SOLUTIONS:

  • Eat more vegetables, fruit, and grains and less meat. Look for meat that is produced in the least harmful way—grass fed, organic, antibiotic- and hormone-free.
  • Buy organic whenever you can.
  • Buy from small, local sources whenever you can.

They also have a nice video. Check them out! And we hope they look at our project as well.

Wasted Food

There was an amazing article on CNN today: Moldy matters: How wasted food is destroying the environment.

A third of all food products worldwide go uneaten! — from a 2011 U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization report

We’ve been collecting data on the food people buy, but it is equally important to keep track of the food people waste! Please read!

Also, we’ve entered the data in the article into our Crowdmap: https://costofchicken.crowdmap.com/

Food for Thought: Sustainability from Counter to Compost

Just watched this video — how appropriate is this? Here’s the description from YouTube:

Food for Thought: Sustainability from Counter to Compost – Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming – 2008-02-26 – The usual reaction to scarfing down a slice of pizza is: how will this affect my diet? The Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, and more and more Americans, now look at the food we all eat and ask: how does this affect our world’s carbon diet? Chairman Edward Markey (D-Mass.) and the Select Committee began looking into the process and choices our nation makes regarding food and agriculture and how those choices affect our environment, specifically the “carbon footprint” of how we grow, raise, transport, package, dispose of and otherwise provide sustenance to Americans and people around the world. And while changing the way the world creates and consumes energy is the most effective way to combat global warming, so-called “lifestyle” choices like the food we eat will play an increasing role in how to make immediate cuts in the pollution that causes global warming. Witnesses: Dan Beard, Chief Administrative Officer (CAO), House of Representatives; Carina Wong, Executive Director, Chez Panisse Foundation; Patricia D. Millner, Ph.D, Research Microbiologist in the Sustainable Agricultural Systems Laboratory and Environmental Microbial Systems Laboratory, USDA; Tom Kelly, Ph.D., Chief Sustainability Officer, University of New Hampshire Office of Sustainability. Video provided by the U.S. House of Representatives.